Tag: TBI

3 Tips on How to Manage the Grieving Stage

3 Tips on How to Manage the Grieving Stage

Good morning. It’s been some time since I’ve written a new post. Winter has a habit of bringing some very unwanted gifts without the option to return it. The evening of Christmas, I was watching a movie with my boyfriend when I began feeling extremely […]

The Dreadful Disability Decision

The Dreadful Disability Decision

Good morning world and all who inhabit it! #SpongebobFTW My last posting was published on the 14th of November. So, what have I been doing all this time? Well, I’ve recovered and I’ve worked very diligently on my website for Strengthening the Muscle of Faith. […]

The Trouble with Triggers

The Trouble with Triggers

I’d like to focus on some #RealTalk today. The change in weather as of late has brought about some terrible migraines, and I mean bad. What exactly can be done about this? How can those of us who suffer with migraines become better prepared and […]

The Jekyll and Hyde of TBI

The Jekyll and Hyde of TBI

One way that I explain and describe my TBI to others revolves around the changes that have been done to me because of the injury. The greatest effect would be to my personality. There are a few differences between the old Amanda and the new […]

Early to Bed, Early to Rise

Early to Bed, Early to Rise

It’s not uncommon for many Traumatic Brain Injury survivors to have complications with sleep. Due to the fact that our brains have to work harder to carry out small tasks throughout the day, we tire easily. In my experience, my fatigue hits right around 2pm. […]

Making Headway with a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Making Headway with a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

There are several diseases that do not get the awareness and recognition that they deserve. A TBI is very much one of them. TBI stands for traumatic brain injury. The main reason that a TBI does not get the attention that it deserves has to […]

A Day in the Life of a Spoonie Sister

A Day in the Life of a Spoonie Sister

Having a TBI is exhausting, both physically, and emotionally. Let’s refer to “The Spoon Theory for a better explanation.” The Spoon Theory is a way that chronically ill people explain to their friends, caretakers, and family what certain “normal” everyday actions cost their bodies to […]